Start Up Business

Do You Have What it Takes to Own a Business?

Whether you are starting your own business from scratch, going into a business opportunity, or buying a business, you need to have certain characteristics, traits, skills, and goals in order to succeed.    So how do you know if you are ready to own a business? Basically, you need to ask yourself some hard questions and give yourself honest answers. If you don’t have the time and commitment to start a business, you need to look elsewhere for your income. You may be better served accepting a job with a company. There are those that need structure and a job is the place for them.  But, if you are inclined to owning your own business, then lets discuss some necessary items.   First, you need to have a plan. The plan can come from your own imagination, the franchisor, or the company offering the business opportunity. It doesn’t have to be something set in stone, and it doesn’t have to be fancy. It just needs to be a basic outline of what your business will be, what you will sell, how you will sell it, and what your operating costs will be. It is recommended that you include at least three months of operating expenses into your start up costs budget, which also needs to be determined in your plan.   The next item is paramount to your success. It is the infamous 4 letter word and that is work.

An Existing Business

Create Your Own Business From Home - Is It Possible To Quit Your Job And Reinvent Your Future?

On the face of it, it should be a lot less risky now than it used to be to buy a business from a stranger. Most (but not all) States and Governments in the developed world have brought in stringent disclosure rules which aim to even things up between the supposedly rapacious seller and the innocent purchaser.Certainly these rules will expose or prevent blatant fraud and misrepresentation, but they can also lull you into a false sense of security. The very worst thing you can think is "Oh well, if the figures don't turn out right I'll just take them to court and sue the pants off them".If you're stuck with a dud business as a result of being deliberately deceived you certainly can take them to court. But you don't need me to tell you of the costs of litigation, the time it takes (years!), and the very real chance you may not succeed anyway.And in the meantime you have to spend your days desperately running a business that may not generate enough to cover these legals. Remember also that lawyers will only take on work on a contingency basis when they think their chances of success are pretty good. It's way, way better to get it right in the first place.Even though most sellers usually turn out in the end to be nice ordinary honest people, I as a valuer always look at them and their businesses with a suspicious mind, and you should too. Because the truth of the matter is that they know far more about the business and what is happening in the industry than you do, and they are quite within their rights to not tell you everything. If you don't ask, you may not find out until it's too late. "Caveat Emptor" is the Latin for "Let the Buyer Beware" and it is still true today despite all the well-meaning but bureaucratic attempts to shield you. Some of the traps I have listed in this and following articles may be legislated against in some jurisdictions and others may have to be disclosed by the vendor. But it pays to know about them anyway.I'll give you these tips roughly in the sequence in which I would check them out. Let me tell you now that everything is wrong with the business I select, but of course I don't know that when I start out. And if it were real I would walk away very early in the piece.I have chosen a retail business to illustrate these traps, but most of them apply equally to service and manufacturing businesses. I have not specified what type of retail business it is, for very good reasons.First, the facts and figures have been made up and do not represent any particular type of business. Second, the same type of business can be totally different in the way it operates and in its risk level from one country to another and even from state to state. Third, I would not want to give any type of business the bad name that this (imaginary) one deserves.So let's assume it is a general type of retail business and call it the GRB (General Retail Business) Shop. Let's also assume that it is a reasonably secure type of business, though somewhat sensitive to competitionLocation is paramount for retail and most service businesses (though the internet is changing that) but less so for manufacturing enterprises.The business broker gives me a half dozen businesses to look at. I select one that seems to be in the right price range - the asking price is $230,000 plus S.A.V. (Stock, (or Inventory) at Value) - and not too far from home. So I pay a visit.It's in a small suburban shopping mall that looks about 20 years old. The mall is busy for early Monday morning, which is a good sign. The shop is well located within the mall with good traffic flow and prominent signage, but is a little bit tired in appearance. A quick check shows it is the only one of its type in the mall. The owners seem friendly and cooperative. I ask if they do home deliveries. They do and take me for a ride around the area covered. There is a new housing estate going up close by which they say will increase business in the future, and the next nearest business of its type is some distance away.Trap 1. Not Being Told of Known Competitor Plans:I leave and decide to have another look at the housing estate. At the far end of it I discover a large sign announcing the imminent construction of a mega shopping mall with a GRB type of business already signed up. So the business is under threat from new competition nearby.The message here is, don't just check the location, check what is happening in the area. Talk to other shopkeepers, talk to locals, visit the council, and look at the demographics to see if they match the market for your products or services. There may be a new highway going through in five years time resulting in a property resumption, or a diversion of traffic away from your site - or it could be good news as well. Established Businesses

Owning Your Own Business - The 10 Things You Must Know

If you have dreamed of owning your own business then you can succeed at it. It is possible for you to be your own boss, acquire more out of life, and feel more satisfied and fulfilled every single day. Often we pursue career opportunities only to realize that we aren't fully satisfied with what we are doing. We desire more out of life but are not quite sure what it is. And it can seem as if something is missing. If you feel like you are missing something in your life then it doesn't have to be that way. Being your own boss might seem intimidating but it shouldn't be. You can actually achieve that goal in a step-by-step fashion that provides you with an opportunity to grow and excel, and then coach and teach others to do the same. Being your own boss is an amazing feeling because it puts you in control of the income you generate. It also gives you the tools and strategies to create the life you desire and deserve.When you own your dream business that means you own a business that is built around your passion and purpose, a business that allows your gifts and talents to shine, and a business that makes a difference in the lives of others. And you can become your own boss for a very affordable investment.Now it is important to understand that becoming your own boss takes a lot of work and dedication. But it is extremely rewarding. If you are willing to put in the work and stay dedicated until you manifest your desired results, then you can be a very successful business owner. Many people dream of owning a business but are not sure how to bring that dream into reality. But that doesn't have to be your story. You can launch and operate the business of your dreams and have dedicated support along the way. It is your time to get off the fence about becoming a business owner and make it happen. An abundance of hidden possibilities are waiting for you. A Small Business

Buying A Business - The Basics

Owning your own business is very rewarding but there are challenges. Among those challenges is being able to get access to the capital you need to sustain and grow your business. Owning your own business is the "American dream." The reality is, however, that buying a business is a serious financial and personal commitment that requires an understanding of what makes a business successful. All too often, new owners jump blindly into a business venture, only to be overwhelmed by the tremendous workload of starting a business from the ground up. Owning your own business is not a 9 to 5 job. Self-employed contract workers (writers, consultants) may work long hours under tight deadlines, while store owners spend anywhere from 80 to 120 hours or more a week maintaining their business. However, many people fall victim to a disastrous assumption. Owning your own business is hard work and there are many more failures than winners. If you do decide to go for it, then you need to go all the way and work your ass off.Starting a small business can test the limits of your endurance. The time, energy and financial commitment can rattle even the most dedicated business person. Starting a small business, after all, is very intimidating. If you want to start your own business, you have to be willing to put it all on the line. Starting a business, whether in your home or outside, is not as simple as some think. However, the benefits rival any small problems that might come along. Believe it or not, it's entirely possible to maintain a work at home career. There are a few ways of achieving the satisfaction of being able to work at home and making a career of it, but the true question is what do you really want to do? An Established Business


Strategy 5

buying a business