Start A Business With No Money

Owning Your Own Business - The 10 Things You Must Know

Whether you are starting your own business from scratch, going into a business opportunity, or buying a business, you need to have certain characteristics, traits, skills, and goals in order to succeed.    So how do you know if you are ready to own a business? Basically, you need to ask yourself some hard questions and give yourself honest answers. If you don’t have the time and commitment to start a business, you need to look elsewhere for your income. You may be better served accepting a job with a company. There are those that need structure and a job is the place for them.  But, if you are inclined to owning your own business, then lets discuss some necessary items.   First, you need to have a plan. The plan can come from your own imagination, the franchisor, or the company offering the business opportunity. It doesn’t have to be something set in stone, and it doesn’t have to be fancy. It just needs to be a basic outline of what your business will be, what you will sell, how you will sell it, and what your operating costs will be. It is recommended that you include at least three months of operating expenses into your start up costs budget, which also needs to be determined in your plan.   The next item is paramount to your success. It is the infamous 4 letter word and that is work.

A Company

Owning Your Own Business - The 10 Things You Must Know

If you'd like to be "set for life" as the owner of a multi-million dollar business -- sitting back and collecting a six-figure salary while other people (who have several years of business experience) "run" everything for you -- then this article will show you how.Listen to this: I've bought over 200 businesses in the past 40 years. In the first 25 of those years, I got owner financing. I got bank financing. I had vendor financing. I did all sorts of things. But, what happened was, I didn't realize there was investor financing. I actually discovered this on complete accident because I needed financing to buy a business in Mexico.You see, nobody was going to finance anything in Mexico. Even today, they won't. So, I had to go back to the investors we had and talk to them. I didn't even realize they would do something like this. So I just sort of lucked into this. And now, for the last 25 years, we have never gone to the bank other than for a line of credit. We don't ask for owner financing. We pay 100% cash on the deal which means the seller gives us a better price than a small cash price. We don't have to qualify. We don't have to give our financial statements. We don't have to do anything. In fact, the average seller will tell you they don't care who you are or what you are if you give them all cash. So what happens is, if you bring an investor in, as opposed to all the other types of financing, it's a lot easier way to go.The other thing with an investor is most of them will ride with you for four or five years. In other words, if you show them what their share of the profits are going to be for four or five years, many of these investors do not ask you to pay a return every month or every quarter, which means you have all the cash available in the business for a four or five year period to expand it. It's really a fantastic way to go, but I want to tell you for the first 25 years, it never dawned on me because I didn't know how to find investors.But now, that's what I use almost exclusively. And I find it's not only cheaper (almost free), but it allows me to buy more businesses and have less work. Reason why is because investors will only put up money for businesses worth a million dollars or more, with an experienced management team already in place. Which means, if you show up, you're almost in the way. The management team you're paying doesn't want you there mucking things up. They would rather you be out playing golf or something. It's a great way -- the only way -- to do business. If you want to pull your hair out buying sandwich franchises and "mom and pop" donut shops, that's your choice. But I'm here to tell you from 40 years of experience buying businesses, it's actually faster, easier and cheaper to buy large, multi-million dollar businesses, where your only real "job" is to cash the checks. Established Businesses

The Advantages of Owning a Home-Based Business

My occupation centers around helping business owners analyze their assets and coaching them on decisions as to whether or not they should sell all or part of their businesses. As such, I am privy to a wide variety of business information and I can tell you first hand, I tend to see a lot of bad operations. Additionally, based on my experience of having owned and operated several businesses myself, I also coach buyers on what to look for in a business and how the process of buying a business works. So it is not uncommon for me to skew to the negative side of things and to look for warning signs that could potentially hurt either party in a business resale transaction. I don't enjoy searching for the negative aspects of business, but I know them and I work hard to seek out, identify, and mitigate the impact that these risk factors may have on either party.However, I don't always find things that are bad. And during this time, with all the doom and gloom of our present economy, I thought I would share a story with you about an operator that stood above the crowd and ran an excellent business.Several years ago, before I began to specialize in the sales and acquisition of convenience stores, I worked as a transactional broker in multiple industries. One of which was the hotel and motel industry. At the time a friend of mine happened to own a boutique hotel in the Caribbean on the island of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. One day he mentioned to me that he was tired and since he had owned the hotel for several years he had decided to sell it so he could spend more time with his family. I agreed to help him and began to review his books and records. Upon initiating my review, one of the first things I noticed was that he was doing a good business...a very good business. By that I mean he was running a 90% occupancy rate and had been for several years. It wasn't like he'd just had a good year or two; he had been having very profitable years for quite some time. When I asked him how he had managed to get the occupancy rate to 90% and keep it there, he said that over the years, during the slow seasons, he would make several small changes to the property to maintain a fresh business. Every six months or so, he made sure to do something different to his hotel. It could be a new painting on the wall in the lobby or new trash containers or new towels, etc. But he would always make some change or add something new for his customers to see.When I asked him why he did that, his reply was, "My customers expect to see something new all of the time." He explained, "You see, even though a lot of my customers may be transient, many of them are not, because I work to keep them coming back to me every year. They enjoy their experience at the hotel and they want to see something different, even if it is a little thing." He also mentioned to me that when occupancy would begin to drop-off he would personally go into the town and offer air conditioned rooms to the locals for a reduced price to help fill his rooms and continue to generate cash flow.Wow, I thought. What a novel idea. He went and asked for someone's business.So I began to work at selling his hotel. I can't tell you how many interested people I had look at his hotel. Finally I found a businessman and his son from Ohio who had seen the property, met with the owner and had even gotten the accountant involved in the sale of the business. But just when I was about to write the purchase agreement the deal came to a screeching halt. The buyer said that he could not buy the business.I asked him why? Was it because of the asking price? Was there something wrong with the cash flow or the numbers of the business that did not look in order? No, it was none of those items at all. The numbers were great and the assets of the hotel were in excellent condition. The answer to why he could not buy the business still rings through my ears today as clear as if it was yesterday. He said, "I cannot buy this gentleman's hotel, because he is doing such a good job of operating it that there is no more upside left for me." He said, "I cannot begin to operate it any better than the present owner, because he has done everything right in operating the business and continues to do so even during the hard times."Astounding as it may sound, this hotel was the proverbial case of a car with eight cylinders running on all eight cylinders and doing so well that there was no more upside left in the business. The business was doing too good to be considered salable.It wasn't until some years later that I encountered this same issue again. I was contacted by a gentleman who owned about 12 convenience stores and had decided that he wanted to sell about half of them to reduce his work load. Here again when I inspected the quality of the physical assets of the stores and reviewed his books and records I discovered that I had encountered another "eight cylinder car running on all eight cylinders".The man and his team were great operators. Whenever something broke in the store or something needed replaced or maintenance on the outside, they fixed it. I could not find a blemish anywhere and most of the stores were over 5 years old. His merchandising and floor plan was laid out well and the store traffic flowed. Every time I visited a store they had merchandising specials throughout the store from different vendors. All of his stores were very profitable and operating well. I remembered the hotel in St. Croix and prepared myself for some tough sales. But I was wrong. I ended up selling all the stores he asked me to sell. I know that the people who bought those stores were happy knowing they were buying excellent running assets. And they were especially happy with the fact that all they had to do to maintain the stores success was to continue with the process of running the stores the same way that the previous owner had.So what is the moral of this story?When buying a business you always have a choice. You can buy a business that is an excellent running business and all you have to do is show up and do the same things that the last owner was doing. This would be like buying an eight cylinder car that is running on all eight cylinders.Or you can buy a business that needs some attention and some tender loving care and has more upside, but will also take more work to get the business tuned up and running well. This would be the eight cylinder car that is only running of six cylinders and needs work. In other words it is a fixer upper.Either way you go you will always generally be farther ahead than trying to start a business from scratch and doing it the hard way. So go for it. Find the business that suits your taste and then decide if you are buying a fixer upper or one you can walk in and is ready to go and begin to enjoy the journey. A Franchise

Which is Better, Investing or Owning a Business?

There are many benefits to owning your own business. I would like to compare this to investing to help you decide which is better, investing or business ownership. While each has its benefits, both are certainly not for everyone. They have there difference and definitely have their similarities. Both represent a form a gaining financial independence. So which one is better?Owning your own business means you have no boss and more tax benefits. It also means how much money you make is up to you. If you work hard enough at anything then it will eventually be profitable. The big benefits include doing whatever your passion is and getting paid for it, deciding when and where you want to work, and being your own boss. This truly represents a freedom that almost everyone desires. The cons of owning your own business could be huge start up costs, working long hours to get the business on its feet, and dealing with big company competition. These are certainly not insurmountable obstacles but they must be considered. The other thing to consider is that many businesses are not even profitable for the first year or so. This is not to say that yours would not be and you hard work would not pay off eventually.Investing in a business is much like investing in the stock market. You are spending money on something right now that you hope will produce more money in the future. However, depending on the types of stocks you are investing in, you can avoid a lot of the cons that come with starting a business. For example, you can actually be very profitable in a short time with the right stocks, such as penny stocks. You can also start with a relatively small amount of money as you learn how to invest.You can keep you day job and use a portion of you income every month to invest in the stock market either through a traditional broker or online trading account. This is not to say that you cant start your own business and put money into investing. Its just that for many it would be too financially difficult to do both. Many businesses are definitely good investments but if that seems beyond your risk tolerance then give stock market investing a try. If you learn the ropes you can earn just as much if not more than if you would have started a business, except you wont have any business expenses except for the small trading fees. Established Businesses


Strategy 5

buying a business